The 2018 Billboard Creative Show  

Artist List 

 

Lawrence Weiner

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Lawrence Weiner’s texts have appeared in all sorts of places over the last five decades and although he sees himself as a sculptor rather than a conceptualist, he is among the trailblazers of the 1960s to present art as language. He defines his sculptural medium simply as ‘language + the material referred to’, in the sense that language is a material for construction.  More


Marilyn Minter

Minter has been the subject of numerous solo exhibitions including the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art in 2005, the Center for Contemporary Art, Cincinnati, OH in 2009, La Conservera, Centro de Arte Contemporáneo, Ceutí/Murcia, Spain in 2009, the Museum of Contemporary Art, Cleveland, OH in 2010, and the Deichtorhallen in Hamburg, Germany in 2011. Her video Green Pink Caviar was exhibited in the lobby of the MoMA in 2010 for over a year More


Laurie Simmons

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Laurie Simmons is an American artist, photographer and filmmaker. Since the mid-1970s, Simmons has staged scenes for her camera with dolls, ventriloquist dummies, objects on legs, and people, to create photographs that reference domestic scenes.


Karine Laval

 Pool - 23

Pool - 23

Born in Paris (France), Karine Laval has been living in New York since 1997. She graduated from the University of La Sorbonne in Paris, where she majored in communications and journalism. She completed her photography and design education at the Cooper Union School, SVA and the New School in New York. Her artistic practice encompasses photography and video. Her still and moving images often challenge the familiar perception we have of the world, and can be seen as a bridge between the world we live in and a more surreal and dreamlike dimension. More


Spencer Tunick

 Dead Sea 6

Dead Sea 6

Spencer Tunick is an American photographer best known for organizing large-scale nude shoots. Since 1994, he has photographed over 75 human installations around the world


Steve Miller

 Health Of The Planet

Health Of The Planet

Steve Miller has been working with art, science and technology since 1980.  Currently, Miller is working on a photographic project about the Amazon.   Miller proposes to give Brazil, our planetary lungs, a medical check-up by taking x-rays of the flora and fauna.  The project entitled Heath of the Planet has been published as a monograph, Radiographic, and presented as solo exhibitions in Rio, London, New York City and, most recently, at the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, DC.



Norm Clasen

 Sunset Chase

Sunset Chase

Norm Clasen was born and raised in Southern California. An avid outdoorsman from an early age, Clasen's passion for photography grew from his love of the natural world. After attending the University of Colorado, Norm moved to Aspen in 1962, where he founded and ran an independent advertising agency.  More 


Andrea Blanch

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Andrea Blanch, Photographer, Founder and Editor in Chief of Musée Magazine, is a New York-based award-winning fashion, fine art and conceptual photographer. She began her photographic career under the tutelage of Richard Avedon, with her first client being American Vogue. Blanch is referred to as “the woman who knows how to capture a woman.” Her work has been published in Details, G.Q., the French, English, American, German, Australian and Italian issues of Vogue, Elle, Harper’s Bazaar, The New York Times Magazine, Esquire, Marie Claire and Rolling Stone. Blanch has had one-woman shows, been featured in group exhibitions and books, as well as private collections. The style of Andrea Blanch shows careful attention to the technique of aesthetics, as well as to the creation of a distinct photographic scenario that has gained her recognition and place in the photography, fashion, and art worlds.

Musée Magazine began for Blanch as a flash of inspiration. She sought to create a magazine which gives exposure to emerging photographers alongside the industry’s most prestigious figures. Musée strives to act as a guide and mentor for emerging photographers, as well as expose our audience to insightful and in-depth interviews with the most important artists of the contemporary photographic world. Since then Musée has grown into an expansive online resource with an ever-growing archive of issues that engages with gallerists, curators, collectors, and photographers alike.

In addition to Musée Magazine, Blanch currently teaches at the International Center for Photography and is a member of APA. Her photobook, Italian Men: Love and Sex, was published with Rizzoli in 1999.



Julia Fullerton-Batten

 Bathers at Tower Bridge

Bathers at Tower Bridge

The River Thames is not even the longest river in the British Isles and a mere pygmy in comparison with many other rivers in the world, yet its significance to British and world history is immense. London is one of the major cities of the world today, but it would not have existed if it were not for the River Thames passing through it. Just before the Thames reaches London it becomes tidal and formed a natural harbour such that London has been a port since pre Roman times. Still today, the Thames acts as an artery of communication and trade route be tween Britain and the rest of the world. I am not alone in my admiration of the glories of the river. Notably, it has been an inspiration to many painters. Monet painted the river repeatedly. Turner too captured the working river even revealing the early nineteenth century fumes and smoke from the city’s factories and river traffic. Whistler was yet another. In the 1860s and 70s he was drawn to paint the bustling and rapidly changing urban neighbourhoods close to the river. But when one views all these works, it is not at all difficult to understand why they all found it such an attractive, potent subject matter. My own fascination with the Thames has now taken a more concrete form. I have made it into a project and in the process of choosing, investigating and photographing a selection of cultural and historical narratives from along its banks. The result to date is the Old Father Thames.


Ruben Natal-San Miguel

 '' Mama '' ( Beautiful Skin ) 2017 Hunts Point Bronx, NYC.

'' Mama '' ( Beautiful Skin ) 2017 Hunts Point Bronx, NYC.

‘’Made in NYC’’ is a celebration of the range of people, life and places that make up the five boroughs of NYC. NYC thrivs during one of the most challenging socio economic and financial times that many major cities in   America are experiencig now due to changing demographics, climate change and fluctuating social values. Out of rebellion, preservation, freedom of expression, this photography series survey e xamines and demonstrates how New York City, one of the most diverse cities in the world, leads, signals a path, sets and sends a message and an example to the rest of America and to the world. In times of oppression, change and constant transformation   NYC continues to be a beacon for human rights and human expression. This series is a love  letter and celebration of NYC, which, has been Natal San Miguel home for twenty five years and continues to be an inspiration for Natal San Miguel and many others in the US and around the world.

 


Kirsten Stolle

 Feed

Feed

For the past several years I have been deepening my research into the influence of agrichemical and biotech companies on our food system. A large part of my studio practice is uncovering information that has been concealed or distorted, often at the expense of public health. With my work, I aim to raise awareness about environmental greenwashing and pose questions about our industrialized food system. The mediums of collage and text based work are ideal formats to explore hidden agendas and reframe industry narratives. I appropriate corporate language and messaging to shed light on problematic histories. My projects have a particular commentary in mind, yet giving the viewer space for an ambiguous reading or even an opposing view often leads to meaningful exchanges.


Matthew Finley

 Mask

Mask

This series has become a reflection of my own struggle with being a shy introvert who seeks connection, yet more often hides or "puts on" what I think others want of me. Anxious, self conscious, awkward. I have made literal our societal programming to pack away those unappealing qualities felt by many, but hidden. In our cultural history, the "ideal" person with the bigger personality and the biggest mouth is often the most prized. They are the squeaky wheel that gets greased. Those who don't fit the mold, be it of gender, race, sexuality, or just a struggle with expressing their thoughts and feelings, are told they are not good enough. Or, more tragically, they are simply ignored. The "less thans" must box away our fragile hearts, affix the correct face, and head out to try and be noticed.

 


Lissa Rivera

 Study with Chairs I

Study with Chairs I

‘Beautiful Boy’ is an ongoing series of photographs of my lover, who is genderqueer. It began with a confession: on the subway one evening, my friend shared that he had worn women’s clothing almost exclusively in college, but was struggling after graduation to navigate a world that seemed to alternately celebrate and revile male displays of femininity. I thought that photography could provide a space to experiment outside of isolation. Taking the first pictures was an emotional experience, and I connected to his vulnerability. Over time he became my muse and eventually romantic partner. After several years, the project continues to evolve alongside our relationship. The images are rooted in the visual language of gender as seen through the history of photography and cinema as well as the pleasures and sometimes perils of looking and being looked at. It is a way to ‘step inside’ images that we have found captivating and investigate what it is like to live each scenario out. I meticulously piece together costumes and seek locations which evoke many architypes and biographies. The trajectory of the project represents a fluid space of emotion and desire influenced by our fantasies and photography’s connection to identity construction. The photographs are not meant to be seamless, but more like an assemblage where you can see the glue, revealing contemporary identity as a collage of the visual language of the past. By presenting BJ within the lineage of great beauties, we are reclaiming our voice in what is attractive and beautiful.

 


Marianne Kolb

 Marianne Kolb

Marianne Kolb

I’ve seriously considered painting a burden, though I do consider it my only means of understanding the world, and, in fact my only means of feeling at home in the world. I don’t know what I feel and think until I paint. Painting is my only means of bringing each day about making peace with myself and creating a place in which I fit into. I try to turn my external environment into an inward reality it’s one of the things that makes me it takes from me and it gives to me. The human figure is the vehicle with which I can most positively relate. I’m preoccupied, fascinated and curious about the solitariness and mysteriousness of human beings. The more developed my curiosity becomes, the more acute, the more complicated, complex and suggestive the world around people becomes. I am also driven and guided by sensory impressions: noise, color, texture, smell, shapes, expressions, tone, language and light.I don’t approach the canvas with a particular image in my mind. I go to it with pigment in my hands and do something to that piece of material in front of me, then work almost at random until the image begins to assert itself. This action depends on the imponderable and I welcome the accidental it creates an arena in which to act. The questions that I always ask are: what do you want to be, what do you want from me and what do you want me to do. Sometimes the painting becomes the answer in other words, I am not trying to prove anything. I am the one who is learning.  


Natalie Chen

 Jello Party

Jello Party

They said the language you speak can affect the way you think. I was born in Taiwan and moved to California at the age of  17.  I was away from family, and I was very aware of  the cultural barriers and felt  quite  alienated.  Ever  since  I  was  bouncing  between  my  culture  and  the  American  culture  and couldn’t figure out a safe place to stand. There is a lack of  consensus about what is appropriate to my parents and how to survive under high school peer pressure in America. When I was 22, I learned that cultural confusion plays a key role in developing depression. Photography allowed me to create a sense of  poetry that counteracted with the struggle of  psychological chaos I felt inside. Often I reflect on my past; I ruminate over my experiences as a daughter and a sister, my cultural identy, and my memories with my family and friends. I want to create personal work to resonate minds. I use food as the main ingredient in my work.  It represents cultures and regions, creates emotions and stories, and connects my Eastern and Western cultures. I also create imagery with a sense of  familiarity in life, using daily objects to set the story and incorporating sensual fabrics and textures to set the canvas for my imaginations. While I am embracing my Western culture more every day, the memories of  the homemade dishes, little items from childhood and the images of  being surrounded by my family are slowly becoming more and more unfamiliar to me. This is why I was eager to create images of  my past. I follow the concept of  Maximalism - more is more, less is bore - living in this rapidly changing material world, I believe that putting more elements in the photographs would let the artwork speak to the viewers and reflect on their minds. The meanings of  my photographs can be elusive. It builds upon the  emotional  and  psychological  journey  between  the  images  and  the  viewers.  This  intention  makes looking at my photographs a storytelling, silent motion picture. I hope that the viewers walk away with a strong sense of  emotion from my work.


Nadine Rovner

 Lana, Golden Age Motel, No.1

Lana, Golden Age Motel, No.1

I orchestrate lush cinematic scenes, exploring a visual world of heightened tension, anticipation, anxiety, longing and desire. These carefully staged, richly textured environments are charged with the nostalgia of idealized Americana yet embedded with a sense of unease on the surface. This is a world populated by strong yet often detached characters, who peer beyond the edges of the frame, silent witnesses to unsettling narratives that remain unknown. Like a film’s opening moments, these scenes are filled with broad possibility.  Or, as in the closing sequence, they are like an unresolved ending —the viewer must carefully sift through scripted clues to fully comprehend the narrative.The protagonists inhabit transitional, anonymous spaces like motels and cars; they are trapped in places without personal touch that possess a suspense where one can hide. The playful, stylistic choice of colorful costumes, wigs and props are instantly transformative and lingers between fantasy and reality; an unspecified era of the glamorous American past. Their hyperreal, glossy appearances are in contrast with their depth of expressions. Filled with existential dramas these characters bear a false facade and are dissonant to their perfectly arranged settings. The subject’s exaggerated beauty is a mask encouraging the viewer to empathize and connect to their emotions. At times, groups of characters are awkward and lacking human engagement.  Each individual is trapped in their own roiling psychological world, suspended in thought. The aesthetics of Americana allow my photographs to address contemporary concerns by creating a setting that is removed from our expectations of reality. As a female, I have struggled with the feelings of oppression, uncertainty, and fear.  These narratives are my visceral reaction to our current political climate, my way of raising awareness of these problems we must all face together. Reflecting these emotions, my photographs are filled with women who struggle against the depiction of one - dimensional objectified appearances. These images advocate for looking beneath the veneer, finding strength over vulnerability.


Gail Postal

 Sasha

Sasha

I have had two major influences on my work old hand tinted black and white Japanese photographs and Russian Orthodox icons.  I do a graphite drawing and then add gold paint and many layers of transparent oil or acrylic paint to create an icon of a contemporary “saint.”


Matt Coglianese

 Walking Asia

Walking Asia

I enjoy bringing the seemingly impossible to life in my artwork. After discovering the potential of digitally altering photos with software like Photoshop, this became the vehicle for creating everything my imagination dreams up. Underneath it all I have a love of architecture, science fiction and the surreal which can all be seen throughout my various creations. 


Dennis Neal Vaughn

 Gesture

Gesture

“Gesture” is about a one - handed conversation and some of the possible gestures one makes during such a conversation. Photography for me is a very intuitive process. It requires me to be engaged in the world, to be connected in some way, and to react to what is before me at any given moment. I always try to be ready to capture an image or experience I am having whenever and wherever I go. In working in this manner, I can then step back and begin to evaluate the photographs I have printed and see patterns, emotions, and themes emerge somewhat organically. Of course this process is always tinged with present and past experiences and how I find my place within the world, where I fit in relation to the photographs, and what my voice is as an artist. Albert Camus in The Myth of Sisyphus stated that, "Thinking is learning all over again how to see, directing one’s consciousness, making of every image a privileged place." I try to discover within the realm of the everyday world that "privileged place," be it in a connection to or in the isolation and disconnection of life out in the city streets and in the landscape, particularly in a post - documentary environment.


Marissa Mackey

 Untitled

Untitled

The series Yoderlust is comprised of found photographs of tourists. The figures within these images have been made anonymous, obscured by map pins like those used to allow visitors to mark where they’re from on a map at a given destination. Abstracted and delineated from the pictured landscape, without story or expression, these characters have been rendered to a visual appendage within the photographic space. The experiential document of putting a pin on a map at once creates a site and alters it, much like a photograph. This work explores the dichotomous role of the tourist through a lineage of snapshot photography. Many of the photos sourced for this series recall stereotypical images of tourists who appear more aware of the camera than their surroundings. I am interested in the spectator as spectacle, and how the visual culture of tourism propagates itself  despite being vastly disparate from what we have traditionally seen as authentic culture, in that it does not belong to a specific place or a people. Tourism points to the human predilection to wonder and explore beyond familiarity, as does our interest in looking at images; however, passive observation, in real space or imagined, still implicates. 


Susan Propper

 Hold that Pose!

Hold that Pose!

The Great Horned Owls in this image were rescued and rehabilitated after suffering severe injuries. Erebus, the owl on the left sustained a broken wing and an eye injury after he was struck by a car in the state of Texas. Athena, the owl on the right, lost part of a wing and suffered burns on her feet as a result of electrical shock from an unprotected transformer in the state of Nebraska. They are now being cared for by Nature's Educators, a wildlife outreach center in Sedalia, Colorado. Nature's Educators is devoted to the protection of injured birds of prey and dedicated to the educational goal of creating a healthy understanding and respect for all animals. Erebus and Athena serve as ambassadors, participating in educational presentations. They're also wonderful models for the paparazzi, striking some charming and engaging poses!

It was a rare experience for me to photograph rescued birds of prey; my photographic work with wildlife has always been out in their natural environment. I greatly appreciated the skill and devotion of the staff at Nature's Educators. They share their love for wildlife with passion and expertise as they strive to educate the public about conservation, preservation, and the protection of wildlife.


Lilia Li-Mi-Yan

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The author shows the human being “corporeity” from different perspectives; she experiments with image forms and textures without using graphic editors.  For   the   author   the   sexuality   is   an   essential   part   of   thinking   and   corporeal existence  of  a  human  being.  Her  works  argue  with  the  imposed  social  doctrine, “the beauty of perfect bodies”, and offer to feel corporeity of sexuality not only from  the  side  of  external  observer,  but  also  through  the  perspective  of  art -object feelings. Affective   side   of   corporeity   sensibility   appears   in   some   works   as   heightened interest to its pathological aspects and mobilize us to legitimize art - expressions. The  author  supposes  that  the  human  body, which  inspires  the  worlds  by means  of corporeity  of  sexuality,  is  the  source  of  any  sense;  the  outside  world  is  being gifted.


Marlies Plank

 Double Fish

Double Fish

 

Marco Walker

 Superstar

Superstar

Fascinated by the natural world, Walker’s current body of work extends his exploration into the extraordinary world of plants, through the mediums of photography and collage. Walker continues to depict the natural world in bold and resolute ways, influenced by Matisse cutouts and Pop Artist Eduardo Paolozzi, he uses striking colours to tease the viewer, inviting them in and keeping them at bay. His works engage with themes of escapism and paradise, celebrating nature’s beauty whilst at the same time Walker aims to remind the viewer of our disconnect to nature, leading us to exploit and destroy it. Plants dominate every terrestrial environment, making up ninety nine percent of the biomass on earth. By comparison, humans and all other animals are, in the words of one plant neurobiologist, “just traces”. 

“M_y_ _a_i_m_ _t_h_r_o_u_g_h_ _t_h_i_s_ _s_e_r_i_e_s_ _o_f_ _i_m_a_g_e_s_ 

_i_s_ _t_o_ _c_e_l_e_b_r_a_t_e_ _t_h_e_ _b_e_a_u_t_

y_ _o_f_ _p_l_a_n_t_s_ 

_a_n_d_ _w_h_i_l_e_ _d_o_i_n_g_ _s_o_,_ _r_e_m_i_n_d_ _u_s_,_ _o_f_ 

_t_h_e_ _p_a_r_t_ _t_h_e_y_ _p_l_a_y_ _i_n_ _o_u_r_ _e_x_i_s_t_e_n_c_e_” _


GERALD  SLOTA

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is  a  fine  artist  and  photographer  who has  been  widely  exhi bited  across  the  US  and abroad. He has had solo shows at the George Eastman House in Rochester, NY, and Langhans Galeriein Prague,  Czech  Republic, as  well  as been shown at  Recontres  D’  Arles  in  Arles,  France.  Slota is represented by Ricco/Maresca Gallery in NYC and the Robert Berman Gallery in LA, and his images have appeared in numerous publications including The New York Times Magazine, Vice, The New Yorker, New York  Magazine,  Discover, and Scientific  America, as  well  as  in BOMB,  Blindspot,  ARTNEWS, Art  in America, and  Aperture. He currently  teaches  at  the  School  of  Visual  Arts  in  NYC,  and  haslectured  at many  institutions  such  as  the  International  Center  for  Photography  (ICP).  Gerald  Slota has  garnered many awards including a Polaroid 20”x24” Grant, a MacDowell  Artist  Residency,  and  a Mid Atlantic  Fellowship  Grant  in  2001  and  2009. Most recently, he was commissioned for an 18’x18’ mural on the Seminole Indian wars by the Norton Museum in West Palm Beach, FL .


Miguel Arzabe

 Tubes

Tubes

In the work Tubes (2015) , Miguel Arzabe looks at how the physicality of paint holds meaning. A large abstract oil painting by the artist is suspended from the ceiling. Its reverse side functions as a projection screen for a series of stop-motion animations, composed of close-up photographs of paint tubes squeezing out their entire contents amidst digitally rendered color fields. The paint tubes, which were given to Arzabe by other artists who ultimately decided to stop painting, embody a sense of anxiety surrounding potential creative failure. Here, Arzabe confronts this anxiety by forcibly releasing all of the paint from each tube in a single continuous motion. The emptying ofthese tubes, symbols of thwarted creative endeavors, becomes a cathartic act, immediately activating empty space through color and form and yielding a dynamic flow reminiscent of bodily functions.


Suzanne Révy

 Door Handles

Door Handles

Sticks and stones, sheets and pillows. windows and shades are a few of the mundane objects that furnish, surround and illuminate the spaces we inhabit. My teenage boys have grown up in this suburban comfort, but as they have matured, a gnawing sense of their impatience with the familiar has emerged.  My own fear is that their adolescence will slip into adulthood with a sense of haste, but imperceptibly, and absent any fanfare or ceremony. My two sons have been muses to me since their childhood. In recent years, however, they seem to have retreated into their rooms, becoming physically and emotionally less available. Turning my camera toward the prosaic and recognizable along with quick glimpses of their bodies and gestures, I search for deeper meaning in the spaces we share and in the objects we have all touched and in their growing bodies. These pictures have eased the tension between the trepidation and the elation I feel as my sons grow away and ultimately depart. The images presented here are recent selections from an ongoing series called I Could Not Prove The Years Had Feet, which is the third of three visual diaries exploring the perils and poignancy of, day to day life in a growing, changing family. 


Ken Pivak

 The Millennial

The Millennial

"The Millennial" is a photographic beauty concept, portraying a young woman who appears overwhelmed with the way her life is surrounded with the never ending "catching up" and the persistent need, to attend to her social media notifications.  She is exhausted to the point she feels like a used doll, which may have seen its better days.

 


Naomi Harris

 First 100 Days

First 100 Days

On January 20th, Donald J. Trump was sworn in as the 45th President of the United States of America. On that same day I set out on a road trip around the US to coincide with Trump's First 100 Days. The idea was to figure out how, when the polls and the media all said Hillary Clinton was going to win by a landslide, did we end up with Trump at the helm instead. I drove around the country talking and photographing a variety of Americans affiliated with both the Republican and Democratic parties as well as those who didn't vote, or could not vote due to voter disenfranchisement. In total I drove through 25 states as well as a portion of the border with Mexico. I ultimately ended the journey on April 29th, Day 100, in Niagara Falls, NY crossing over the peaceful border into my homeland of Canada. 

 


Patti Bartelstein, aka bella luca

AllAreWelcome.jpg

My work is often concerned with the notions of storytelling through time, light, presence and history. My subjects are expressed in a highly personal, metaphorical way. ‘The hazy outlines of solid forms melting into the immateriality of light and shadow create aform of digital impressionism.” Influenced by the pinhole camera, impressionism & surrealism, I am drawn to the ethereal and mystical quality that derives from these works. Additionally, I challenge myself with the unknown, bringing into play my buddhist beliefs & philosophy to the forefront of my art, the practice of presence & acceptance. The combination of film, filters, shifts of focus, exposure, movement, position of the camera, and scale results in a completely unique image that merges abstraction and realism, transporting the viewer where contemplation, connectivity and enlightment immediately arise. I work from the inside out, using internal narrative as the foundation in which to produce my canvas that reinterprets space, light and form found in the external. As a visual artist and founder of The Project Room, I draw upon the creative energy and brilliant connections which have directly empowered myself while empowering others. From all of this, my life’s work became clear, a dedication to what I have titled, “The Study of Connectivity”, an ongoing and constantly evolving body of work.


Marybeth Rothman

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The integration of encaustic, photography and collage in my work occurs simultaneously as a dialogue develops among these elements.  The mixed media approach to my work is both additive and subtractive; employing many subtle layers to form an amalgam of biographical texture. The facial expression and posture of the figure in my photographs influence my palette, lines and marks that I use to create the narrative abstract drawings and paintings. As I continue to work, these disparate elements transcend the physical attributes of the materials and become one brush for me to paint portraits of strangers. The images I choose for these photo collage, encaustic* and mixed media portraits are selected individually and then again in response to each other. This curatorial process is somewhat circular as the photos are chosen, discarded and chosen again until an affinity develops among them. Over time, the juxtaposition of the photos on my worktable, a swatch of paint, or a sketch initiates a conversation among these elements. A series emerges. I work on three or four paintings simultaneously to insure a sense of visual and narrative continuity. My portraits are united in a series by an imagined geographic locations or cultural bonds, for example The Hobby Horse Literary Guild, Francis County or The Hudson Dove Society. The basic human response to identify the other is endlessly intriguing to me.